Down the TBR Hole #13: Books 141-160

I’m back with another attempt to get my TBR under control. I feel like I need to just put aside an entire afternoon dedicated to going through my Goodreads and organizing it.

Lia from Lost in a Story’s challenge “Down the TBR Hole” has helped me whittle down my massive virtual TBR, or at least get me thinking critically about what books I’m actually going to read. I’ve realized I’ve added a lot of books in 2012 and 2013 that I’ve never read and will probably never get around to reading!! There’s also a ton of books that I added in the moment that I’ve never even thought of since then.

“Down the TBR Hole” works like this: order your Goodreads “to be read” shelf with the oldest books first and remove the ones you’re no longer interested in reading. I’ve added in two of my own personal rules: if I have multiple books in a series I’ll only keep the next (or first) one I have to read, and I’ll remove complete works or collections (unless it’s a collection I already own).

Middlemarch by George Eliot
Date added: Apr 25, 2015
keep

The Girl Who Chased the Moon by Sarah Addison Allen
Date added: Apr 25, 2015
keep

An Ideal Husband by Oscar Wilde
Date added: Apr 25, 2015
remove

The Importance of Being Earnest and Other Plays by Oscar Wilde
Date added: Apr 25, 2015
remove

On Writing Well by William Zinger
Date added: May 8, 2015
removeRead More »

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March Reading Wrap-Up: What do you do when your dog eats your book?

  • Home Sweet Maison by Danielle Postel-Vinay
  • Yoga Mind by Suzane Colon
  •  A Little Bit of Crystals by Cassandra Eason
  • A Little Big of Chakras by Chad Mercree
  • The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
  • Fullmetal Alchemist 3-in-1 Volumes 4, 5, 6 by Hiromu Arakawa
  • Orange: Future by Ichigo Takano
  • The Astonishing Color of After by Emily X. R. Pan
  • Other People’s Houses by Abbi Waxman
  • Can’t Help Myself by Meredith Goldstein (ARC)
  • A Little Bit of Meditation by Amy Leigh Mercree
  • When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon
  • Azumanga Daioh Omnibus by Kiyohiko Azuma
  • Our Bodies, Ourselves by Boston Women’s Health Book Collective
  • The Diviners by Libba Bray
  • Lair of Dreams by Libba Bray
  • Before the Devil Breaks You by Libba Bray
  • This is How I Save My Life by Amy B. Scher (ARC)
  • Being a Dad is Weird by Ben Falcone

 

  • Dear Martin by Nic Stone
  • In the Fall They Come Back by Robert Bausch
  • Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz
  • Before the Devil Breaks You by Libba Bray
  • Train Man by Machiko Ocha and Hitori Nakano
  • Kimi ni Todoke vol. 1 by Karuho Shiina
  • The Room on Rue Amélie by Kristin Harmel (ARC)
  • Bunny Drop vol. 1 by Yumi Unita
  • Under the Wide and Starry Sky by Nancy Horan
  • What You Don’t Know About Charlie Outlaw by Leah Stewart (ARC)
  • The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver

 

I am currently writing this about four hours after my dog ate the cover off one of my paperbacks.

Now, I am constantly donating books in order to make room on my shelves. This was a book I was planning on keeping, but also knew I probably wouldn’t read again. After I noticed my ripped two-thirds of the cover, I tore the rest of it off, plus the first two pages in front of the title page. Now I just have a mangled paperback like the ones we used to recycle at Barnes and Noble.

(The first time I found out that we recycled books at Barnes and Noble I almost had a conniption. WHY?)

So like, what do I do? Do I keep the book on my shelf without a cover? Should I recycle it because I’m never going to read it again anyway? I don’t feel like I can give it away like this.Read More »

Eye Candy: Books I Almost Bought #01

Y’all ever go into a bookstore without a specific book in mind and just get completely overwhelmed???

The worst for me was this one time last November; between working at Barnes and Noble just shy of a year and becoming more familiar with book blogs and bookstagram and book twitter, I felt like I knew alllllll of the books in that store. It was like my brain was in an actual fog I was so lost; I almost went up to a bookseller and just asked them to put a random book in my head and I swear I would’ve left with it.

Now obviously there are times I go in and know exactly what I want, but rarely do I ever manage to be that one-track minded.

Every time I go into a bookstore I have my phone in hand, taking photos of the books I want to buy but probably won’t. Then when I get home, I add them to my goodreads tbr (which is probably why my tbr is over 1400 books!!!).

I’ve tried searching for a meme or even a post similar and I couldn’t find one (but maybe I was just searching the wrong things?). Anyway, I’ve decided to start my own! Every time I go into a bookstore, it’ll be followed by a post of books I want but didn’t get around to buying this round.

I’ve set this post up with the book, a simplified summary from Goodreads, and a short note about the book. Cover photos are linked to their Goodreads page!

Barnes and Noble, Mar 24 2018 (12 books)

Marilyn in Manhattan by Elizabeth Winder

Marilyn in Manhattan: Her Year of Joy

The iconic blonde bombshell is not only happy, but successful. Marilyn breaks her contract with Fox Studios to form her own production company, a groundbreaking move that makes her the highest paid actress in history and revolutionizes the entertainment industry. A true love letter to Marilyn, and a joyous portrait of a city bursting with life and art.

I’m not a huge fan of Marilyn Monroe, only because I don’t know that much about her. I always browse the biography section to see if are any good memoirs, and this book stuck out for me. It sounded really interesting, and I’ve been drawn to New York City in different time periods lately.

The Librarian of Auschwitz by Antonio Iturbe

The Librarian of AuschwitzFourteen-year-old Dita is one of the many imprisoned by the Nazis at Auschwitz. Taken, along with her mother and father, from the Terezín ghetto in Prague, Dita is adjusting to the constant terror that is life in the camp. When Jewish leader Freddy Hirsch asks Dita to take charge of the eight precious volumes the prisoners have managed to sneak past the guards, she agrees. And so Dita becomes the librarian of Auschwitz.

This was on one of the YA tables and immediately picked it up because it sounds so interesting! (And just a tad bit similar to The Book Thief but it also has really good reviews.) However, the cover was eerily similar to the next book I grabbed…Read More »

Down the TBR Hole #12: Books 121-140

You know how some people do book buying bans? Do people ever do “adding books to my Goodreads TBR” bans? Because I might start one. I’m inching towards 1400 books and it’s so overwhelming.

Lia from Lost in a Story’s challenge “Down the TBR Hole” has helped me whittle down my massive virtual TBR, or at least get me thinking critically about what books I’m actually going to read. I’ve realized I’ve added a lot of books in 2012 and 2013 that I’ve never read and will probably never get around to reading!! There’s also a ton of books that I added in the moment that I’ve never even thought of since then.

“Down the TBR Hole” works like this: order your Goodreads “to be read” shelf with the oldest books first and remove the ones you’re no longer interested in reading. I’ve added in two of my own personal rules: if I have multiple books in a series I’ll only keep the next (or first) one I have to read, and I’ll remove complete works or collections (unless it’s a collection I already own).

Funny in Farsi by Firoozeh Dumas
Date added: Oct 1, 2014
keep

Arabian Jazz by Diana Abu-Jaber
Date added: Oct 1, 2014
remove

How Does it Feel to be a Problem? by Mustafa Bayoumi
Date added: Oct 1, 2014
keep

Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer
Date added: Oct 1, 2014
keep

Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some We Eat by Hal Herzog
Date added: Feb 6, 2015
removeRead More »

April TBR List

April is an insanely busy month for me (I feel like it’s busy for everyone!). I have work programs at least one day every weekend, and I’m also participating in Camp NaNoWriMo! I doubt my reading habits will be as strong as they were this past month.

Out of the 11 books I included on my March TBR, I read or started to read 7 of them. I’m extremely satisfied with that number (it’s more than half!) because I definitely overshot the amount of time I was able to sit down and read this past month.

Moving forward into April, I’ve added 9 books to my TBR for the month. Again, I doubt I’ll get to all 9, and I’m sure I’ll read books that aren’t on my TBR for the month, but this is just a way to keep me on track.

I’ve set this post up with the book, a simplified summary from Goodreads, and a short note about the book. Cover photos are linked to their Goodreads page!

Friend book club pick: The Keeper of Lost Things by Ruth Hogan (owned)

The Keeper of Lost Things

Once a celebrated author of short stories now in his twilight years, Anthony Peardew has spent half his life lovingly collecting lost objects, trying to atone for a promise broken many years before. Realizing he is running out of time, he leaves his house and all its lost treasures to his assistant Laura, the one person he can trust to fulfill his legacy and reunite the thousands of objects with their rightful owners. But the final wishes of the Keeper of Lost Things have unforeseen repercussions which trigger a most serendipitous series of encounters…

A few of my friends from college get together once a month to video chat over our chosen book. We’ve missed the past two or three months or so because of ~life~ so I’m excited to pick our book club back up and with a book I’ve been hoarding on my bookshelf! This also seems like a short and fast read so I’m excited to knock this off my TBR.Read More »

Down the TBR Hole #11: Books 101-120

It’s the start of a new 100 books! I’ve structured them a little differently than the last couple of posts because I’d like to starting adding 20 books to my Down the TBR Holes instead of 10 and figured this was more visually appealing than one giant list.

Lia from Lost in a Story’s challenge “Down the TBR Hole” has helped me whittle down my massive virtual TBR, or at least get me thinking critically about what books I’m actually going to read. I’ve realized I’ve added a lot of books in 2012 and 2013 that I’ve never read and will probably never get around to reading!! There’s also a ton of books that I added in the moment that I’ve never even thought of since then.

“Down the TBR Hole” works like this: order your Goodreads “to be read” shelf with the oldest books first and remove the ones you’re no longer interested in reading. I’ve added in two of my own personal rules: if I have multiple books in a series I’ll only keep the next (or first) one I have to read, and I’ll remove complete works or collections (unless it’s a collection I already own).

A Walk to Remember by Nicholas Sparks
Date added: Apr 21, 2013
remove

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
Date added: Apr 21, 2013
keep (physical TBR)

A Separate Peace by John Knowles
Date added: Apr 21, 2013
remove

Pretty Little Liars by Sara Shepard
Date added: Apr 21, 2013
remove

Someone Like You by Sarah Dessen
Date added: Apr 21, 2013
keepRead More »

25 Books for 25 Years

This week I’m turning 25. I’m only a little stressed out about it. And by little, I mean like Pluto-is-the-littlest-planet little. (Also I know Pluto isn’t really a planet but like, it still makes a good metaphor right?!?)

Image result for friends i'm totally freaked out about turning 25
same, Tag, same

I’ve been thinking a lot about books that have shaped my reading (and writing) habits in my life. I tried to make a list of one book per year, but I can’t say that I had a favorite books for the ages of 1-6 (at least not that I remember). Instead I decided to ballpark it, so the first ten books or so are books that I read during elementary school.

Covers are linked to Goodreads profiles; summaries are excerpted from Goodreads

The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein

The Giving Tree

Every day the boy would come to the tree to eat her apples, swing from her branches, or slide down her trunk…and the tree was happy. But as the boy grew older he began to want more from the tree, and the tree gave and gave and gave. This is a tender story, touched with sadness, aglow with consolation. Shel Silverstein has created a moving parable for readers of all ages that offers an affecting interpretation of the gift of giving and a serene acceptance of another’s capacity to love in return. 

Who didn’t love The Giving Tree as a child? I think had to be one of the books I remember crying over. (Also it makes sense to me now that my mother would read this book to me, she’s a tree lover.) Definitely one of the books I’m going to pass down to my children one day.

Falling Up by Shel Silverstein 

Falling Up

Poor Screamin’ Millie is just one of the unforgettable characters in this wondrous new book of poems and drawings by the creator of Where the Sidewalk Ends and A Light in the Attic. Here you will also meet Allison Beals and her twenty-five eels; Danny O’Dare, the dancin’ bear; the Human Balloon; and Headphone Harold. So come, wander through the Nose Garden, ride the Little Hoarse, eat in the Strange Restaurant, and let the magic of Shel Silverstein open your eyes and tickle your mind.

I hesitated putting two books by the same author on the list, much less back to back, but when it came down to it I couldn’t decide which one to pull because I feel like both of them had the same value to me and at the end of the day it’s my list on my blog and I can do what I want!!!!! I bought this book at the end of a school year, right before summer vacation.

Meet Kit: An American Girl 1934 series by Valerie Tripp

Meet Kit: An American Girl 1934 (American Girls: Kit, #1)

Kit longs for a big story to write in her daily newspaper for her Dad—that is, until she’s faced with news that’s really bad. When Mother’s friends lose their house and come to stay with her family, it’s nothing but trouble for Kit. Then Kit’s dad loses his business, and things go from bad to worse. Will life ever be the same again?

Third grade sparked the American Girl doll craze and of course, I had to have one. My parents said I would could get a doll but it had to be one of the historical dolls, and I had to read all of the books in that doll’s series first. Even as I child I was ExTrA so I started borrowing ALL of the American Girl books from the library, reading series after series until I was caught up with each doll. Ultimately I ended on Kit because she was my favorite. (The following year I chose Josephina as my next doll because she was my second favorite.)

Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Clearly

Beezus and Ramona (Ramona Quimby, #1)

Nine-year-old Beezus Quimby has her hands full with her little sister, Ramona. Whether she’s taking one bite out of every apple in a box or secretly inviting 15 other 4-year-olds to the house for a party, Ramona is always making trouble–and getting all the attention. Old enough to be expected to take responsibility for her little sister, yet young enough to be mortified by every embarrassing plight the precocious preschooler gets them into, Beezus is constantly struggling with her mixed-up feelings about the exasperating Ramona.

I FLEW through the Ramona series in elementary school. I distinctly remember specific scenes from the book; Ramona eating the first bite of all the apples in the box because the first bite of an apple is the best bite, or Ramona filling up her bathroom sink with toothpaste by squeezing the tube in the middle because it looked like fun.Read More »

20 Questions for Character Development

You’ve all heard them before: “what’s your characters biggest fear?” “what color are their eyes?” “when’s their birthday?” “do they have any pets?” “what sets them apart when they talk?” “what’s their sign?” “if they could be any animal, what would they be?”

Listen. I’m bored.

Characters are my absolute FAVORITE part of writing. I love getting to know my characters. I love seeing them grow like little seedlings. I love morphing them into people.

In 4th grade, we did a fiction writing unit where we had to come up with a short story in our writer’s notebooks. Before the short story, we had to assemble a character by listing their traits on the left side of the notebook and drawing a picture on the right side.

This moment was so critical to my life that honestly I still remember it clearly (I think I might still have the notebook somewhere).

After I did the character study for my main character, I continued on to do all of my secondary characters, not required by my teacher. I was obsessed.

Since then, I’ve made lists of question after question for my characters. I’ve sculpted list upon list of all the “important” things I need to know before starting a story.

And guess what? None of it really matters!!!!

Read More »

Down the TBR Hole #10: Books 91-100

Well, I finally went through my first hundred books on my Goodreads “to be read” shelf! (Only about a thousand more to go 😅😅😅)

Lia from Lost in a Story’s challenge “Down the TBR Hole” has helped me whittle down my massive virtual TBR, or at least get me thinking critically about what books I’m actually going to read. I’ve realized I’ve added a lot of books in 2012 and 2013 that I’ve never read and will probably never get around to reading!! There’s also a ton of books that I added in the moment that I’ve never even thought of since then.

“Down the TBR Hole” works like this: order your Goodreads “to be read” shelf with the oldest books first and remove the ones you’re no longer interested in reading.Read More »

ARC Review: The Room on Rue Amélie by Kristin Harmel

 

The Room on Rue AméliePage Count: 400 pages
Publication Date: March 27, 2018
Age Range: Adult
Source: Goodreads Giveaway
Goodreads: The Room on Rue Amélie

When newlywed Ruby Henderson Benoit arrives in Paris in 1939 with her French husband Marcel, she imagines strolling arm in arm along the grand boulevards, awash in the golden afternoon light. But war is looming on the horizon, and as France falls to the Nazis, her marriage begins to splinter, too.

Charlotte Dacher is eleven when the Germans roll into the French capital, their sinister swastika flags snapping in the breeze. After the Jewish restrictions take effect and Jews are ordered to wear the yellow star, Charlotte can’t imagine things getting much worse. But then the mass deportations begin, and her life is ripped forever apart.

Thomas Clarke joins the British Royal Air Force to protect his country, but when his beloved mother dies in a German bombing during the waning days of the Blitz, he wonders if he’s really making a difference. Then he finds himself in Paris, in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower, and he discovers a new reason to keep fighting—and an unexpected road home.

When fate brings them together, Ruby, Charlotte, and Thomas must summon the courage to defy the Nazis—and to open their own broken hearts—as they fight to survive. Rich with historical drama and emotional depth, this is an unforgettable story that will stay with you long after the final page is turned.

(Source)

I was fortunate to receive a copy of this book through a Goodreads giveaway and to say I was psyched would be a massive understatement. I am complete World War II trash; I will read practically any story that takes place in any realm of WWII.

I was excited to read this story because it the premise sounded unique and unlike most stories I’ve read. I love having multiple characters and narrators especially when they all have different backgrounds.

However, I was ultimately disappointed by The Room on Rue Amélie.

Read More »